Front Page Forums Genesis Week Three Discussion Question: Melchizedek & Jesus

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  • #1033
    Jamie
    Keymaster

    Read Hebrews 7 – What do we learn about Jesus as the High Priest?

    #1039
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Melchizedek was in some ways the prototype of Jesus Christ. His unusual name can be explained. The Hebrew word melek means king, and tsedek means righteousness, so his name is explained as meaning “king of righteousness.” And since shalom means peace, he was also the “king of peace.”

    However, Melchizedek had no parents that are mentioned in Scripture. Jesus did have parents, and a detailed genealogy, along with a recored birth and a death. Melchizedek’s position as priest did not depend on his parents or his genealogy

    The primary role of a high priest at that time was to speak with God on our behalf. Now Christ now makes intersection for us. John 14:6 “Jesus said to him, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.”

    #1041
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Reading about Jesus in Hebrews 7 is really fascinating. Unlike priests in the order of Aaron, Jesus is a priest forever. Unlike priests in the order of Aaron, Jesus is a holy priest who only had to sacrifice once for the sins of all. Unlike priests in the order of Aaron, Jesus is a perfect priest who can “save completely those who come to God through him.” (verse 25).
    This, I think, is really exciting and encouraging stuff! We have a high priest who is perfect, lives forever, has already sacrificed for us and will never have to again, and can save us and reconcile us to God completely! Wow. What an amazing savior we have.

    #1045
    Jamie
    Keymaster

    Wow! Great insights guys! Yes…the uniqueness of Jesus being in the “order of Melchizedek” is a wonderful truth for us.

    Follow-up question: Because Jesus “has already sacrificed for us and will never have to again”, how does this impact the way we talk to people about their sin, separation from God, etc.?

    #1053
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I think that leads right into God’s plan for salvation. Taking on sin for us. If we understand what we have been saved from, it takes judgment out of talking to other people’s their sin.

    #1054
    Jamie
    Keymaster

    Most current evangelism models begins with emphasizing the sins of the person we are talking to. But if Jesus, our high priest, has already died once…for all sins, then what really keeps someone from having a relationship with God and entering into the new life He desires for them to experience?

    #1057
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Developing and maintaining a strong relationship with God requires time, effort and the desire to be close to Him. Just as relationships with other people take work and devotion, so does a relationship with God. Putting forth that effort can lead to a greater sense of belonging, inner peace, compassion and love. Choosing to pursue this relationship and keep it strong is something anyone can do to improve their outlook on life. Most don’t try at all. They ether never had an experience with Him (Psalm 34:8), or they don’t understand His forgiveness for them.

    #1058
    Jamie
    Keymaster

    I 100% agree with that Matt. These are great insights coming from someone that would consider themselves a follower of Jesus. But for someone that does not consider themselves a “Christian” or a “believer” how do we communicate the Gospel to them? What did Jesus say to people? Did he tell them they were sinners and they needed to say a prayer?

    #1063
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Really interesting questions. It seems to me that the apostles preached more along the lines of “repent and believe,” and Jesus preached more along the lines of “follow me” (though Jesus did preach repentance from sin (e.x. John 8:1-11, emphasis on verse 11) and belief in him (e.x. John 3:1-21), too). However, I don’t think that these two emphases in preaching need be mutually exclusive. Perhaps following Jesus includes, but is not limited too, repenting from our sins and trusting in him as not only Lord, but Savior. And I don’t think this necessarily needs to include a prayer, though I don’t see any reason that it can’t start with one. Fundamentally, however, this call to repent and believe seems to me to be representative of a call to a reorientation of the heart from sin to Jesus (and all that that reorientation includes and entails: trusting in him to save us, submitting to and following his teaching, communing with fellow believers, sharing this message of hope and redemption with others, etc.).

    So, perhaps the best way to share the gospel with someone is to present it as an invitation to follow Jesus, one that is open to all and that we all should take advantage of if we want to be right with God. Then, perhaps we can explain what following Jesus entails. That’s my initial thought, anyway.

    “But if Jesus, our high priest, has already died once for all sins, then what really keeps someone from having a relationship with God and entering into the new life He desires for them to experience?”

    That is a really interesting question. Does “All will be saved” follow from “Jesus died for the sins of all”? If Jesus paid the price for all sin, then why would anyone be punished for their sins on judgment day? These are questions that I have had before.

    After some reflection, it seems to me that since Jesus did pay the price for all sin, then the only thing that people may still deserve judgment for is rejecting HIM. Since he is God, this seems to me to be the gravest of sins, and one that God cannot let go unpunished.

    So, perhaps, at the end of it all, the only thing that will keep people from Jesus is their rejection of his every effort to save them. Though such a rejection will undoubtedly merit the punishment God gives for it, it won’t be something forced upon anyone but a result of their own choice. I have a hunch that C.S. Lewis was on to something when he suggested that judgment day may be something like this: Some will say to God, “Thy will be done,” and God will say, “Come.” And God will say to others, “Thy will be done,” and away they will go.

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